A Creamless Way to Reduce Crow’s Feet – From Clinical Interventions in Aging – Anti Aging – Reno Nevada – Dr Ken Romeo

OPINION:  Dr Ken Romeo   775-870-6942

“Scientists tested the efficacy of oral supplements astaxanthin, a well known remedy against wrinkles with a patented Rose Hip powder, Hyben Vital®, which is made from the seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging.” The results are statistically significant.

“A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35-65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow’s-feet) were subjected to a randomized and double-blinded clinical study of the effects of the rose hip powder, as compared to astaxanthin. During the 8-week study, half of the participants ingested the standardized rose hip product, while the other half ingested astaxanthin.

Objective measurements of facial wrinkles, skin moisture, and elasticity were made by at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires.

cia-10-1849Fig1
See Source Below.

In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index) in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P≤0.05.

In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements in crow’s-feet wrinkles (P<0.05), skin moisture (P<0.05), and elasticity (P<0.05) after 8 weeks of treatment.

A similar improvement was observed for astaxanthin, with P-values 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05. Likewise, both groups expressed equal satisfaction with the results obtained in their self-assessment. The rose hip powder further resulted in increased cell longevity of erythrocyte cells during storage for 5 weeks in a blood bank.

The results suggest that intake of the standardized rose hip powder Hyben Vital® improves aging-induced skin conditions. The apparent stabilizing effects of the rose hip product on cell membranes of stored erythrocyte cells observed in this study may contribute to improve the cell longevity and obstructing skin aging.”

Cell longevity is essential for good aging.

According to WebMD, the side effects and safety are:

Rose hip is LIKELY SAFE for adults when taken by mouth appropriately. Rose hip is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin appropriately, short-term.

Rose hip can cause some side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, stomach cramps, fatigue, headache, inability to sleep, and others. Inhaling rose hip dust can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking rose hip if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using amounts larger than those found in food.

Bleeding conditions: Rugosin E, a chemical found in rose hip, might slow blood clotting. Taking rose hip might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Diabetes: The vitamin C in rose hip might affect the control of diabetes, but not all experts agree on this.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD deficiency): Large amounts of the vitamin C in rose hip might increase the risk of complications.

Kidney stones: Large amounts of the vitamin C in rose hop might increase the risk for kidney stones.

Iron-related disorders such as hemochromatosis, thalassemia, or anemia: Use rose hip with caution if you have any of these conditions. The vitamin C in rose hip can increase iron absorption, which could make your condition worse.

Sickle cell disease: It is rare, but the vitamin C in rose hip might make blood more acidic, and this could bring on a sickle cell crisis. It’s best to avoid use.

Surgery: Rugosin E, a chemical found in rose hip, might slow blood clotting. There is concern that rose hip might cause bleeding if used before surgery. People taking rose hip should stop at least 2 weeks before surgery.”

The HARF does not endorse any specific products.

Yours in Health!

Dr. Ken Romeo

Dr. Ken Romeo is a Principal and Chief Clinical Data Coordinator for the Healthy Aging Research and Foundation (HARF) in Reno, NV.

Though each article contained on this Blog is derived from published Clinical and Research data contained in various national and international databases with links provided,

NO ARTICLE OR CONCLUSION IS MEANT TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT OR CURE DISEASE.

CONSULT YOUR HEALTH PROFESSIONAL BEFORE MAKING ANY CHANGES TO YOUR HEALTH REGIMEN.

 Source: Clin Interv Aging. 2015 Nov 19;10:1849-56

CONTACT: DrKenRomeo1@yahoo.com

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