Natural Substance vs. Nano Cosmeceuticals for Facial Wrinkles – Anti Aging – Reno Nevada – Dr Ken Romeo

OPINION: Dr. Ken Romeo   775-870-6942

As women age and go through menopause they lose their estrogen supply. Result? Facial wrinkles, crow’s feet and general dryness of the skin.

Common over-the-counter nutraceuticals seem a rational choice to combat the estrogen fall in their bodies.

But can natural supplementation work as well as estrogen supplements to fight wrinkles and help women regain their youthful appearance? Yes, but you need to start early and create a proper supplementation regimen.

The most common supplements in anti-aging for both women and men are: Aloe vera, Curcumin, resveratrol, Vitamins C and E, green tea and genistein. Each of these compounds have been exploited by the cosmeceutical industry by nan0-sizing them into compounds for use on the face, lips and hair.

Though the nano-synthesis theory may be correct in conception there are no studies that I am aware of that study their sustained use and potential toxicity in long term use. In fact, the opposite exists.(See next opinion post regarding genistein and cancer)

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How are many of the anti-aging delivered to the skin and facial areas? Carbon nanotubes. I cannot find any studies relative to the long term use of this technology and safety. Carbon nanotubes need to be studied for their roles in toxicity. This review broadly focuses on the usage of phytocompounds in various cosmeceutical products, nanodelivery technologies used in the delivery of phytocompounds to various cosmeceuticals, and various nanosized phytocompounds used in the development of novel nano cosmeceuticals to enhance skin-based therapy.

Women taking aromatase inhibitors to treat breast cancer or prevent its recurrence should think twice before also taking a soy-based dietary supplement, researchers report.

Genistein, a soy isoflavone that mimics the effects of estrogen in the body, can negate the effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors, which are designed to reduce the levels of estrogens that can promote tumor growth in some types of breast cancer.

Yours in Health!

Dr. Ken Romeo

Dr. Ken Romeo is a Principal and Chief Clinical Data Coordinator for the Healthy Aging Research Foundation (HARF) in Reno, NV.

Though each article contained on this Blog is derived from published Clinical and Research data contained in various national and international databases with links provided,

NO ARTICLE OR CONCLUSION IS MEANT TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT OR CURE DISEASE.

CONSULT YOUR HEALTH PROFESSIONAL BEFORE MAKING ANY CHANGES TO YOUR HEALTH REGIMEN.

Contact: DrKenRomeo1@yahoo.com (Reno, NV)

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